Solbit’s Argentinian find: bathroom humor!

Dear Nicalai,

I’m am so sad today.  We have begun our trip from South America back to the US.  We’re waiting at the Trelew airport for a flight. Trelew is in Patagonia.  Papa is in the Men’s room.  He went there to get away from my whining again and again, “I want to stay here!”  Even after our wonderful seven months living in Ecuador, Peru, and Argentina, I’m not yet ready to go home.

Papa just came back from the Men’s Room.  He saw me still pouting to Nona, but he returned anyway. Right away, he found a way to cheer me up with some bathroom humor.

“Solbit, you have to look at this photo that I just took in the restroom,” he said enthusiastically.  “Papa, I’m not sure that would be appropriate,” I replied, even before Nona could close her dropped, disapproving jaw.

“Don’t worry,” he said, “I didn’t go low with my iPhone camera. You’ll appreciate this and so will Nona.  Nona, close you mouth and look here.”  Then he exposed his big iPhone 6 screen for us to see. “This is what I saw when I was standing in the bathroom and turned my head,” Papa explained.

Papa said he felt like “The Eyes of Trelew” were upon him, just when he needed his privacy!

Papa said he felt like “The Eyes of Trelew” were upon him, just when he needed his privacy!

“For just a fraction of a second, I thought a woman was staring at me through her sunglasses, and then I started to laugh, because I realized I’d been fooled,” Papa laughed, and we did too. “That is funny!” Nona exclaimed, “I wonder if there’s one in the women’s restroom?”  She and I checked.  There was! That one is a big mirror made to look like a man’s sunglasses though. Nona and I laughed again, and I almost forgot to be sad.

Papa said that the mirrors in the Men’s and Women’s rooms weren’t just “bathroom humor” but also art.  “Art?” I questioned, “in a bathroom? I don’t think so.”  Nona jumped in, “Oh, sure, art can be found almost anywhere.  Remember the mural outside of that pizza shop in Buenos Aires, Solbit?”  I did remember that painting of movie characters. Check this out.

Right there at the pizza shop was Don Corleone and Darth Vader.  Wonder if either of them liked pizza? Does Darth Vader eat or is he just a machine now?

Right there at the pizza shop was Don Corleone and Darth Vader.  Wonder if either of them liked pizza? Does Darth Vader eat or is he just a machine now?

Oops, our plane is here. We have to put the computer away and board. I’ll have to finish this email another day.  Stay tuned…..

Our art appreciation continued when we arrived at our next stop, Washington, DC.  Nona and Papa took me to the Phillips Collection — they collect art there.  We saw this amazingly detailed portrait called, “Mercy,” by Whitfield Lovell.

A fine portrait doesn’t need to be in oil paint on canvas. This dignified image of a man who was made a slave is in charcoal and on wood.

A fine portrait doesn’t need to be in oil paint on canvas. This dignified image of a man who was made a slave is in charcoal and on wood.

I guess art can be found in many different places and can be created out of many different things.  For another example, look at this.  Papa said he thought it was oil paint on canvas, and he’s right.

Nona really liked this ballpoint pen and crayon portrait by his wife, Sally Michel. I do too.  Hey, I have a ball point pen and crayons. Maybe I’ll try being an artist!

Nona really liked this oil on canvas portrait of Marsden Hartley by Milton Avery.  I don’t have canvas or oil paint, but, hey, I have a ball point pen and crayons. Maybe I’ll try being an artist!

Well, as you can tell, we’re back in the USA.  Although I’m sad to have left South America, I’m pretty happy eating great food at Uncle Tom & Aunt Barbara’s home on Capitol Hill, and we can just walk to the free Smithsonian museums on the mall here to see more art. It’s not South America, and I do miss hearing Spanish, but I can’t complain. Bye!

I’m your friend.

Love,

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Solbit

November 20016

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  • You may be asking yourself, “Who is Solbit?” Solbit is a fictional character, but she is a real plastic dinosaur, sent to us unsolicited in a package we ordered from Photojojo. So, she’s a plastic jurassic. Solbit is short for the four names given her by our grandchildren: Sparkle, Orangie, Lulu, Breakit. We tend to use her given names for when she’s been naughty. Thank you for visiting Tales of a Plastic Jurassic. Solbit likes company and hopes you’ll come back.
  • You can learn more about Solbit at her About page and in the earlier posts, “Solbit: How I Got My Name” and “Solbit: How I Got to Travel.”