Solbit’s Shows that Small Is Beautiful

Dear Nicalai,

Being small, I notice things that bigger creatures usually miss.  What bigger creatures?  Well, Nona and Papa serve as two examples.  Sometimes they need help — my help — to see the smaller things in life.  In my opinion, seeing the smaller things in life is very much underrated.  Most people seem to want to just see the bigger things in life, see the bigger picture, see the grand plan.  That’s ok, I suppose, but, as a tiny creature, I can point out what they’re missing in life.

Oh, I forgot to mention that we’re in Bahia Bustamante on the coast of Patagonia.  Our lodge is so remote that it has no phone service, no internet, and no electricity, except in the evening when they start up a gasoline powered generator from 7 to midnight.  Now, back to my story about small is beautiful.

We went for a group walk with our excellent guides, Nicholas and Ignacio, to a special place.  It’s special because it has the remains of a forest where the fallen trunks and branches of huge trees have turned to stone.  So, while everyone else focused on looking at big stone logs —now don’t get me wrong; those were interesting — I focused on finding small things, and Nicolas helped me.

This very small lizard was bigger than I am, so Nicolas had to hold him, while I took a look.  Nice face, huh?

This very small lizard was bigger than I am, so Nicolas had to hold him, while I took a look.  Nice face, huh?

I easily saw this small gem, but Nona and Papa had to put on their old peoples’ eye glasses to see it.  Once she saw it, Nona agreed this was worth a photo shoot.

Nona picked this photo out of the many she took of this little pink flower. I think her photography is getting better with practice.

Nona picked this photo out of the many she took of this little pink flower. I think her photography is getting better with practice.

Being an open minded creature, I was willing to look at some big things, too.  I have to admit that, on first look at this big thing, I thought I was looking at a piece of a fallen tree.  Wrong.

It’s petrified wood. Stone.  Minerals have replaced the wood in a way that makes the stone look like wood!

It’s petrified wood. Stone.  Minerals have replaced the wood in a way that makes the stone look like wood!

Tall trees don’t grow in this part of Patagonia and haven’t for eons of time.  So, the petrified forest tells us what an ancient forest looked like, and, also, that the climate here used to be very, very different than it is at present.  Now big trees can’t grow here, but way back in ancient times trees grew all over this place.

I turned around and almost bumped into these two small things.

Nona needed no push to photograph these two.  She was on them with her camera in a second. Didn’t need her old person’s glasses, either.

Nona needed no push to photograph these two.  She was on them with her camera in a second. Didn’t need her old person’s glasses, either.

In addition to small things, I enjoy pointing out rarely seen things to Nona and Papa.  So, when I saw this foot print, I said, “Well, I think this must be the first real iguanodon footprint that we’ve ever seen!”  I mean, I was excited to think that I might actually see one of my own kind in the flesh, right here in Patagonia.

No such luck.  Turns out, this footprint was made by something called a “lesser rhea” - a bird - not an iguanodon.

No such luck.  Turns out, this footprint was made by something called a “lesser rhea” – a bird – not an iguanodon.

Bummer! On the other hand, later we saw a “lesser rhea,” and what a sight that was.  It looks like a big bird on stilts wearing a large, feathery tutu.  Papa said that it looks like another bird, an ostrich.  You won’t see lesser rheas in North America, except maybe at a zoo.  They like the freedom to run wild in the wide open spaces of Patagonia. I do too.

Bye!

I’m your friend.

Love,

signature

 

 

 

Solbit

October 2016

*New reader? Get oriented below.

  • You may be asking yourself, “Who is Solbit?” Solbit is a fictional character, but she is a real plastic dinosaur, sent to us unsolicited in a package we ordered from Photojojo. So, she’s a plastic jurassic. Solbit is short for the four names given her by our grandchildren: Sparkle, Orangie, Lulu, Breakit. We tend to use her given names for when she’s been naughty. Thank you for visiting Tales of a Plastic Jurassic. Solbit likes company and hopes you’ll come back.
  • You can learn more about Solbit at her About page and in the earlier posts, “Solbit: How I Got My Name” and “Solbit: How I Got to Travel.”