Solbit asks, “Does This Picture Look Upside Down To You?”

Dear Nicalai,

Another thing I want to show you about Canyonlands National Park:  A lot of things appear to be upside-down, but they aren’t!  It can be weird being in some of those spots that look upside-down but aren’t. Weird but fun.  Really, you’ve got to visit this magical place.

This picture confuses me. The big heavy rock should be at the bottom, right? We saw this on the Cave Spring Trail.

When I first got near some of these upside-down places, just looking at them made my head feel funny, and my eyes wanted me to stand on my head.  I’ve tried standing on my head and am no good at it.  I think my head is too pointy.  Can you stand on your head?

How can I explain what happened to make these upside-down places in this huge park?  Again, water and gravity went to work on these rocks and, over millions of years, just whimsically sculpted out weird formations.

These magical, upside-down rocks make me think that they want an audience to look at them. Nona walked me under a lot of them, and they didn’t collapse on us.

Wow, did these places have an audience when we were there.  We weren’t the only ones enjoying these mind spinning views.  On the other hand, it wasn’t too crowded, and everyone was very nice to each other.  You know that everywhere we travel around the world and here in the US, the people we meet — plus the occasional plastic dinosaur cousin — are friendly and helpful.

The lizards here seem to like the right-side-up type of rocks. Look at those long toes, good for climbing and hanging on!

If I were living here, I’d be like that lizard.  I like my world right-side up.  Going to upside-down places is ok for amusement once in a while, but for day-to-day living I want right-side up.  For example, who can work on an upside-down desk with and upside-down computer? I would never get a letter to you written!

9332 – pocket garden, Caption: “Ever hear the song, “Islands in the Stream?” This is more interesting; it’s an island in the Rock. A lot of these islands can be seen in Canyonlands.

Those island gardens started me thinking.  I asked Nona, “Can we please make some island gardens like those when we settle down in a place some day?” She’s thinking about it, but says that where we’re going won’t have those big rocks to hold an island garden.

Ever hear the song, “Islands in the Stream?” This is an island in the Rock. A lot of these islands can be seen in Canyonlands.

That got me to thinking some more.  I suggested that we could pour lot of concrete behind our place — if we ever stop traveling — and shape it like those rocks and make the garden in the depression after the concrete gets really, really hard. We just dump a pile of sand in the depression and put plants in it!

Nona said, “Yes, we could do that, but we won’t because our neighbors would not appreciate a huge lump of concrete next to them.”  She is so practical, and, as you can see, she really thinks about the other person, not just what she wants.  I’ve got to work on that in myself. I guess I’m too focused just on what I want.

Bye!

I’m your friend.

Love,

 

 

 

Solbit

May 2017

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  • You may be asking yourself, “Who is Solbit?” Solbit is a fictional character, but she is a real plastic dinosaur, sent to us unsolicited in a package we ordered from Photojojo. So, she’s a plastic jurassic. Solbit is short for the four names given her by our grandchildren: Sparkle, Orangie, Lulu, Breakit. We tend to use her given names for when she’s been naughty. Thank you for visiting Tales of a Plastic Jurassic. Solbit likes company and hopes you’ll come back.
  • You can learn more about Solbit at her About page and in the earlier posts, “Solbit: How I Got My Name” and “Solbit: How I Got to Travel.”