Solbit Kicks Back in Portlandia

Dear Nicalai,

Did you ever watch “Portlandia,” the TV series about Portland, OR?  That’s where we are now, in Portland, not in the TV show.   I have one word for that show, “Funny.”  Hey, I’m just a plastic jurassic, and even I get the humor.  What’s so great is that people in Portland enjoy the show, too.  They can laugh at the ridiculous, over-the-top stereotypes of themselves.  I like that about the wonderful people here.

Another thing I like about Portland. It’s motto is “Portland Works.”  They do work hard here.  Yet, unlike so many working places in this country, they also know how to kick back, relax, and have fun.  That makes them more productive and happy.  I can tell by the smiles on their faces as we walk around town and by how friendly and helpful everyone is to us.  No wonder Uncle Josh and Aunt Tanya decided to settle here.

Well, I’ve got some pictures of myself for you.  They show me doing what Portlanders know how to do so well:  Kick Back and Relax.

I chose this flower for my meditation time.  I assume my pose and let go of all my cares and try to be at one with this lovely flower.

I chose this flower for my meditation time.  I assume my pose and let go of all my cares and try to be at one with this lovely flower.

A favorite place of mine for relaxing is Portland’s International Rose Test Garden.  Anyone is welcome to come here to enjoy the roses.

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I start appreciating the rose flower as I approach it.

 

Once I’m at the flower — and because I’m so tiny — I’m allowed to actually climb on the delicate rose flower.  Now, you can’t do that.  You’re too big. So don’t do what I do.  OK?

Once I’m at the flower — and because I’m so tiny — I’m allowed to actually climb on the delicate rose flower.  Now, you can’t do that.  You’re too big. So don’t do what I do.  OK?

 

When I’m standing on a rose flower, I can get a perspective on the garden, and, if the wind blows, the rose lifts me up and down, up and down…I can get sea sick, but not always.

When I’m standing on a rose flower, I can get a perspective on the garden, and, if the wind blows, the rose lifts me up and down, up and down…I can get sea sick, but not always.

 

The soft caress of the rose petals promotes relaxation.

The soft caress of the rose petals promotes relaxation.

Another thing, when I go back to Uncle Josh and Aunt Tanya’s after sitting in these roses, they always say, “What’s that lovely scent I’m smelling now?”  Then I surprise them by saying, “That’s me! I just returned from relaxing in the roses!” Then one of them will put me on her or his shoulder, inhale deeply, and say, “I love the smell of roses in the morning!”  Me too.  Bye.

I’m your friend.

Love,

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Solbit

June 2015

*New reader? Get oriented below.

  • You may be asking yourself, “Who is Solbit?” Solbit is a fictional character, but she is a real plastic dinosaur, sent to us unsolicited in a package we ordered from Photojojo. So, she’s a plastic jurassic. Solbit is short for the four names given her by our grandchildren: Sparkle, Orangie, Lulu, Breakit. We tend to use her given names for when she’s been naughty. Thank you for visiting Tales of a Plastic Jurassic. Solbit likes company and hopes you’ll come back.
  • You can learn more about Solbit at her About page and in the earlier posts, “Solbit: How I Got My Name” and “Solbit: How I Got to Travel.”

Solibit declares “It’s all about style and opinion”

Dear Nicalai,

When it comes to style, most people dismiss the opinions of a plastic jurassic like me.  Well, often they don’t even bother to dismiss me, they just presume A., that I don’t have a style, and B., that I don’t have opinions.  Now, that’s just wrong.  Take this nigella flower for example.

You’re thinking blue colored flower, right? I’m thinking something else.

You’re thinking blue-colored flower, right? I’m thinking something else.

Of course, it is a blue-colored cornflower, but that’s just so blah.  Take a good look at it again and then also look at me up at the top of this blog.  See?  It’s a shade of blue.  That kind of blue is called “azure.”  It’s like the sky on a clear day, AND azure complements which color?  Orange!  That’s me! Don’t believe me, well, just look it up on wikipedia.  Here’s the link:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Azure_(color) So, azure and I go together like a horse and carriage. Also, this tiny cornflower is little, and little is just my size.

Now take this tree blossom as another example that tells something about my style.  It’s a perfectly good blossom on a lovely tree, but, look, it’s just not my style.

Even though it’s little, like me, it’s color just doesn’t do anything for me.

Even though it’s little, like me, it’s color just doesn’t do anything for me.

It’s washed out pink color and fragile appearance just doesn’t complement my orange coloring nor my strong constitution … and strong opinions.

Now I can go in an entirely other direction with my style.  I can find something little and something of another color and be very happy with it.  Here’s my last example. Green moss.

Don’t you love the way this moss and it’s rich green color envelop the rock without smothering it?

Don’t you love the way this moss and it’s rich green color envelop the rock without smothering it?

Don’t you think that this moss enhances the appeal of the rocks?  To me, this moss was so inviting that I said to Nona, “Please, lay me down on that moss so I can smell it and take a nap on it.” Let me tell you, girl, that was a lovely part of my afternoon. Pure, natural luxury. So, now you know.  I have opinions, and I’ve got style. Bye!

I’m your friend.

Love,

Solbit

June 2015

*New reader? Get oriented below.

  • You may be asking yourself, “Who is Solbit?” Solbit is a fictional character, but she is a real plastic dinosaur, sent to us unsolicited in a package we ordered from Photojojo. So, she’s a plastic jurassic. Solbit is short for the four names given her by our grandchildren: Sparkle, Orangie, Lulu, Breakit. We tend to use her given names for when she’s been naughty. Thank you for visiting Tales of a Plastic Jurassic. Solbit likes company and hopes you’ll come back.
  • You can learn more about Solbit at her About page and in the earlier posts, “Solbit: How I Got My Name” and “Solbit: How I Got to Travel.”

Solbit’s colored view

Dear Nicalai,

When ever someone asks me, “Solbit, what is your view on coordinating colors?” I like to begin my reply with, “Nature.…”  I think Nature does so well putting together colors that go well with each other, don’t you?  You can see Nature’s color sense at work in this photo.

Even the plants and insects seem to be color coordinated! I told Papa, “This bee and I obviously have something in common. Look how it wants to be close to that yellow in the flower.”

Even the plants and insects seem to be color coordinated! I told Papa, “This bee and I obviously have something in common. Look how it wants to be close to that yellow in the flower.”

“I hate to burst your bubble, Solbit, but something else is going on here.  Actually, I may burst two of your bubbles.  First, what that bee wants to get close to is the flower’s pollen, and, second, that flower is both Nature and human designed, because some person bred that flower to look like that,” Papa explained.

I stood my ground though, “Well, the bee likes yellow then because yellow tells the bee where the pollen is, and Nature made human beings, as well as flowers, so the person was working with Nature, not alone, right.”  Papa stared at me and muttered, sort of to himself, “From the lips of a Plastic Jurassic.” I’m counting that as a win for me!

Take another example about Nature and color. We saw this lovely flower recently at the LA Arboretum.

Isn’t she lovely?  Even if this flower didn’t complement my beautiful orange complexion, I would still say she is lovely.

Isn’t she lovely?  Even if this flower didn’t complement my beautiful orange complexion, I would still say she is lovely.

I thought the next flower didn’t go with my complexion, but Nona said, “Solbit, I think this flower’s light lime-green and your orange actually work.”  I’m pretty sure that “actually work” means “go together,” not hard labor.  (Papa is working with me on something he calls idioms, and I think maybe that’s an idiom.)  Oops, there I go getting off the topic.  Back to colors.

J Paul Getty Museum (and gardens)

Saw this at the J Paul Getty Museum (and gardens). I guess ants like lime-green too.

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I’m partial to yellow and red, especially when they come together the way they do in this flower.  Nature just has a way with color.

When we walk in this Pasadena neighborhood, I feel especially at home.  Can you guess why?

Yeah, all that orange makes me just feel like I belong here.  Don’t get me wrong though, if I were green, or any other color, I could still belong here.  I don’t think it is natural to discriminate or exclude others by color.  We all belong here.  I’m just saying how the color seems to welcome me.

Yeah, all that orange makes me just feel like I belong here.  Don’t get me wrong though, if I were green, or any other color, I could still belong here.  I don’t think it is natural to discriminate or exclude others by color.  We all belong here.  I’m just saying how the color seems to welcome me.

Now, before I say goodbye, I’m going to show you a flower that we saw, and it was not the color that attracted me. I just love it’s name.  Nona says that it is a “passion flower.”

Look how Nature put together all those lovely shapes into one delicate flower. What a sense of design!

Look how Nature put together all those lovely shapes into one delicate flower. What a sense of design!

When I said that about Nature’s design sense to Papa, he said, “Yes, Solbit, Nature could teach architects and engineers a lot about design, if only they’d take the time to look and to listen.”  I wonder what is he talking about.  Does that make any sense to you?  He says some weird things sometimes, but I still like him.  Know what I mean?  Bye for now!

I’m your friend.

Love,

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Solbit

March 2015

*New reader? Get oriented below.

  • You may be asking yourself, “Who is Solbit?” Solbit is a fictional character, but she is a real plastic dinosaur, sent to us unsolicited in a package we ordered from Photojojo. So, she’s a plastic jurassic. Solbit is short for the four names given her by our grandchildren: Sparkle, Orangie, Lulu, Breakit. We tend to use her given names for when she’s been naughty. Thank you for visiting Tales of a Plastic Jurassic. Solbit likes company and hopes you’ll come back.
  • You can learn more about Solbit at her About page and in the earlier posts, “Solbit: How I Got My Name” and “Solbit: How I Got to Travel.”

Solbit’s Horn With A View

Dear Nicalai,

When we stopped in Rancho Mirage — on our way to Palm Springs — and saw this big guy, I asked Papa, “What’s that?” He shrugged and said, “Must be a big horned something or other.”

Nona, as usual, had done her research and knew the answer, “Solbit, that’s an imperiled species, called a Desert Bighorn Sheep. Do you know that by 1985, only about 280 of these sheep remained in southern California?”  I said,  “Quick, Nona, get a picture of  me with him, before he goes the way of my iguanodon ancestors!”

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Can you find me on the tip of the horn? Quite a view up here!

Don’t worry, this Desert Bighorn Sheep isn’t real, or, well, it’s real, but it’s a sculpture, not a living breathing mountain beast. (Hey, it’s sort of like me only bigger!) I hope we get to see the real one’s when we go hiking this month in the mountains.  Nona says that, thanks to conservation efforts, the Big Horn Sheep population here has grown in recent years, so we have a chance of seeing them this month.

Yeah, we’re here for a month, and wait until you see our AirBnB here in Palm Springs.

Walk through that palm gate to find a secluded pool and garden full of the fragrance of jasmine.

Walk through that palm gate to find a secluded pool and garden full of the fragrance of jasmine.

Nice, huh.  I plan to spend my afternoons poolside snoozing.  Nona and Papa’s friends and family back on the east coast are freezing and nearly shoulder deep in snow, but I’m in wonderful Jurassic-appropriate 80F temperatures and clear blue skies!

Why’s it so warm here?  Desert.  You might think desert means just hot sand, but the desert has a lot of life in it.  Look at these beautiful plants.  They’re called cactus plants.

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Watch out, these pretty little things have sharp stickers!

Don’t get too close to them though.  The spines on them are like needles and they can give a girl reason to yell, “OUCH!”

Anza-Borrego State Park

Girl, take my advice, don’t try this. Take my word for it. My word for it is “ouch.”

I overheard this mom tell her little one, “Now, sweetie, look but don’t touch the cactus.”

Mom's know best, but kids will test.

Mom’s know best, but kids will test.

As soon as she turned her back, the innocent little kid was running over to one of those cactus plants, hand stretched out to feel it.  The next thing that mom heard was …you guessed it…screaming.  “Ouch!”  That’s what I like to call “learning by doing.”  Fortunately, no permanent harm was done.

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These flower have eye popping color, don’t they. I wonder, is that why they’re called poppies?

Not all the plants in the desert are prickly.  These poppies and flowers are, as Nona told me, “…pleasing to the eye.”  Papa said that our world is full of beauty, and we just need to look for it wherever we are.  I said, “OK, Papa, but this desert is also full of rocks, gravel, snakes, and spiders, and I’m going to look out for them too.”

I’m your friend.

Love,

Solbit

February 2015

*New reader? Get oriented below.

  • You may be asking yourself, “Who is Solbit?” Solbit is a fictional character, but she is a real plastic dinosaur, sent to us unsolicited in a package we ordered from Photojojo. So, she’s a plastic jurassic. Solbit is short for the four names given her by our grandchildren: Sparkle, Orangie, Lulu, Breakit. We tend to use her given names for when she’s been naughty. Thank you for visiting Tales of a Plastic Jurassic. Solbit likes company and hopes you’ll come back.
  • You can learn more about Solbit at her About page and in the earlier posts, “Solbit: How I Got My Name” and “Solbit: How I Got to Travel.”