Nona and Papa tell me “No!” but I want to fly!

Dear Nicalai,

When we arrived in Lima, Peru, we went for an evening walk in our neighborhood.  Our neighborhood is called Miraflores, and I really like it. So do Nona and Papa.

Something else I like here, or, well, I think I would like it: On our walk we saw these paragliders, and, right away, I knew flying in Miraflores was for me. So, I said, let’s do that! Nona and Papa both said, “No!” in a way that I knew they really meant it.

All you need to paraglide is right here in Lima: strong ocean winds and a cliff to jump off, and you’re airborne!

All you need to paraglide is right here in Lima: strong ocean winds and a cliff to jump off, and you’re airborne! Look at them taking a selfie way up there!

I’m still wondering what Nona and Papa don’t like about flying around Miraflores attached to a big kite. Is it the cost or the jumping off a cliff part? Maybe both?

You have choices when paragliding in Miraflores -- get close up to the high-rise buildings or take an excursion out over the ocean.

You have choices when paragliding in Miraflores — get close up to the high-rise buildings or take an excursion out over the ocean.

Watching these people paragliding was fun, but I bet you have more fun actually doing it.  Some people went up there on their kite all by themselves.  They were the ones who did a lot of zooming, diving, and climbing.  Others went with a pilot.  That’s called “going tandem,” and, if you don’t know how to paraglide, you can go tandem with an experienced pilot. That’s how I’d start out, if only Nona and Papa would let me.

This is the little paraglider' airport by the ocean. They have a paragliding school here too!

This is the little paraglider’ airport by the ocean. They have a paragliding school here too! We watched this fellow a long time. He never did take off.

We think that guy must have been just learning how to paraglide. I know that, if I were facing that steep cliff by myself for the first time, I would take a long time to step off.  Wouldn’t you?

You have to steer to miss hitting, trees, lighthouses, and buildings.  Learning to steer would be very important, I think.

You have to steer to miss hitting, trees, lighthouses, and buildings.  Learning to steer would be very important, I think.

On the other hand, I saw a lot of paragliders who took off, zoomed around, and landed just like they were going for an evening walk.  Just that easy.  Papa said, “Solbit, with experience comes ease and grace.  You can see it in some of those fliers up there, can’t you?”  I sure could, and, don’t tell Nona and Papa, but I’m going to find a way to get that experience. Look for me showing “ease and grace” in the clouds one of these days. Stay tuned. Bye! I’m your friend.

Love,

signature

 

 

 

Solbit

August 2016

*New reader? Get oriented below.

  • You may be asking yourself, “Who is Solbit?” Solbit is a fictional character, but she is a real plastic dinosaur, sent to us unsolicited in a package we ordered from Photojojo. So, she’s a plastic jurassic. Solbit is short for the four names given her by our grandchildren: Sparkle, Orangie, Lulu, Breakit. We tend to use her given names for when she’s been naughty. Thank you for visiting Tales of a Plastic Jurassic. Solbit likes company and hopes you’ll come back.
  • You can learn more about Solbit at her About page and in the earlier posts, “Solbit: How I Got My Name” and “Solbit: How I Got to Travel.”

Solbit finds mummies  and “legos” too at ancient pyramid

Dear Nicalai,

Hey, we moved to Peru. We’re in a neighborhood of Lima, Peru.  It’s called Miraflores.  Oh, you’re gonna love this letter! I know how you love mummies, and Miraflores has them.  Oh, you love Legos, too, and Miraflores has something ancient that reminds me of legos.

We found both the mummies and the “legos” in the same place today.  No kidding.  The place has several names but let’s just say it is the ruins of an ancient pyramid. Look at this.

Call these ruins what you like -- The Huaca Pucllana, Pucllana or Huaca Juliana or Wak'a Pukllana -- this place is an amazing pile of dirt bricks!

Call these ruins what you like — The Huaca Pucllana, Pucllana or Huaca Juliana or Wak’a Pukllana — this place is an amazing pile of dirt bricks!

You might wonder why would someone go to the trouble of making all these handmade dirt bricks and then piling them up so carefully, so wide, and so high.  I wondered.  So, I looked it up on Wikipedia.

The pyramid is pretty high up, so, from the top, we got a good view of the modern city of Miraflores.

The pyramid is pretty high up, so, from the top, we got a good view of the modern city of Miraflores.

Sounds to me like the place was very important long ago, 200 CE to 700 CE. That’s more than 1300 years ago! I guess the leaders of those ancient people tried to please the gods and to govern the people from here. They had something called the Lima Culture, but I don’t know anything about that.  I need to read more, right?

OK, get ready, because here comes a South American mummy!

The ancient people mummified their dead, gave them nice little rooms on the pyramid, and brought them food and drink. Looked like a lot of leftovers to me.

The ancient people mummified their dead, gave them nice little rooms on the pyramid, and brought them food and drink. Looked like a lot of leftovers to me.

Now, here come the “legos!”

Long before the days of plastic, somebody had the "lego idea." The stacked handmade adobe and clay bricks to make things.

Long before the days of plastic, somebody had the “lego idea.” They stacked handmade adobe and clay bricks to make things.

Guess what, these ancient people were smart.  They figured out how to stack all these dirt bricks in a way that earthquakes couldn’t knock them down. Amazing!

Now, you probably are asking yourself, “Why didn’t these mud bricks just dissolve in the rain and wash away after all these centuries?” Good question.  Answer: Because it almost never ever rains in Lima, even though it’s right on the Pacific coast of Peru.  Isn’t that surprising? OK, that’s it for today. Bye!

I’m your friend.

Love,

signature

 

 

 

Solbit

July 2016

*New reader? Get oriented below.

  • You may be asking yourself, “Who is Solbit?” Solbit is a fictional character, but she is a real plastic dinosaur, sent to us unsolicited in a package we ordered from Photojojo. So, she’s a plastic jurassic. Solbit is short for the four names given her by our grandchildren: Sparkle, Orangie, Lulu, Breakit. We tend to use her given names for when she’s been naughty. Thank you for visiting Tales of a Plastic Jurassic. Solbit likes company and hopes you’ll come back.
  • You can learn more about Solbit at her About page and in the earlier posts, “Solbit: How I Got My Name” and “Solbit: How I Got to Travel.”