Solbit remembers making friends in Peru

Dear Nicalai,

I know I should be writing you about our next big adventure, and we are having fun now, but you know how sometimes your mind just keeps going back to some pleasant times, rather than getting with the current program.  That’s me now.  We had a slow but very pleasant time in Cuzco, and I think I have to write you about it, just so I can put it behind me and move on.

I guess I’m sort of missing my canine (that means dog) friend, Sandy. Did I already tell you about her?  We saw her every day when we walked to the Plaza de Armas.

My Cuzco friend, Sandy, liked to use her tail as a pointer.  She'd point out things she wanted me to see.

My Cuzco friend, Sandy, liked to use her tail as a pointer.  She’d point out things she wanted me to see.

Of course, Cousin Susie was still with us when we were in Cuzco, and I can’t get it out of my mind how she talked about our seeing the Inca ruin that’s named “Sexy Woman.” Except, of course, it isn’t.  It has a Quechua name that sounds something like that, but it’s really “Sachsaywaman,” that means “falcon” or “variable hawk.”

Nona introduced me to an alpaca (or was it a llama?) at “Sachsaywaman.” Still, thanks to cousin Susie, I’ll always think of it as “Sexy Woman.”

Nona introduced me to an alpaca (or was it a llama?) at “Sachsaywaman.” Still, thanks to cousin Susie, I’ll always think of it as “Sexy Woman.”

Sachsaywaman is where you can see AMAZING stone work of the Incas.  Everyone has their photo taken in front of a spot in the wall like this.

Where else can you see fine stone work like this except in Peru?

Where else can you see fine stone work like this except in Peru?

Papa talked about the “ingenuity” of the Inca people, and he asked me, “Solbit, do you think we people could do something this beautiful with stone today?”  I just shrugged, and then he said, “I think it is a lost art.”  So, I asked him, “Well, why don’t you help look for it? It must be around here somewhere.  How far could it have gone, anyway?”  He patted me on my head and smiled.  I think that means he didn’t want to take the time to go looking for it.

Cousin Tom has also been coming to mind.  I think he’s a bit like me.  He likes the llamas and the alpacas, but he has a hard time telling the difference, too.

Cousin Tom took photos of my new friends, but he kept his distance.  I don't know why.  These alpacas were very friendly.

Cousin Tom took photos of my new friends, but he kept his distance.  I don’t know why.  These alpacas were very friendly.

I wonder if Cousin Tom could keep some llamas and alpacas on his and Cousin Susie’s wildlife refuge in New Jersey?  If he did then, eventually, we’d get pretty good at knowing the difference between a llama and an alpaca, wouldn’t we?  Do you think I should send him a suggestion like that?  Another benefit would be that their herding dog, Luna — she’s a puli — would have friends that she could herd! Oh, say, have you seen Luna, she has amazing fur, Papa says she is covered in dreadlocks, and she is! Just look at her …

Did you know that not just dogs like luna have dreadlocks.  Some people have them too.  I know I’ve seen them.

Did you know that not just dogs like luna have dreadlocks.  Some people have them too.  I know I’ve seen them.

Well, next time I write, I’ll tell you about our new place. Bye!

I’m your friend.

Love,

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Solbit

August 2016

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  • You may be asking yourself, “Who is Solbit?” Solbit is a fictional character, but she is a real plastic dinosaur, sent to us unsolicited in a package we ordered from Photojojo. So, she’s a plastic jurassic. Solbit is short for the four names given her by our grandchildren: Sparkle, Orangie, Lulu, Breakit. We tend to use her given names for when she’s been naughty. Thank you for visiting Tales of a Plastic Jurassic. Solbit likes company and hopes you’ll come back.
  • You can learn more about Solbit at her About page and in the earlier posts, “Solbit: How I Got My Name” and “Solbit: How I Got to Travel.”