Solbit Finds “Big Water” A Fearsome Place

Dear Nicalai,

Hi, we changed countries again.  We’re still in South America, but it’s goodbye Peru and hello Argentina.  Argentina is a really long country, 2,268 miles long.  It runs from north to south along the east coast of South America along the Atlantic ocean, but it’s only 889 miles wide, from east to west.

Nona and Papa told me we were going to a place that was beautiful and “very scenic,” that means it has great views all around.  Well, I don’t think so!  Iguazu Falls just scared me and almost blew out my eardrums too.  Those waterfalls are really loud.

"Iguazu" is a word that is formed from 2 native words meaning "big" and "water." Iguazu Falls is Big Water, for sure.

“Iguazu” is a word that is formed from 2 native words meaning “big” and “water.” Iguazu Falls is Big Water, for sure.

The falls created what Nona called a “mist,”  as in, “Oh, Solbit, you’ll soon dry off. That was just a little mist.”  Oh, yeah, well, I’d call it a shower, and we weren’t even under the falls.  The falls just splash everywhere. I’m little.  I could have drowned.  I think Nona and Papa could be charged with “plastic jurassic endangerment,” but, don’t worry, I’m not going to press charges.

As if those falls weren’t fear inducing enough, after our walk out to the falls, they took me out to lunch in the park.  Sounds nice, right?  Well, it wasn’t.  All you have to do is take a seat on a park bench or a picnic table, put a little food in your hand (OK, I have paws, I guess) and you’ll soon look like a carpet trampled by these little monsters.

I don't know where the word "coati" comes from but it ought to be from 2 words that mean "big" and "nuisance," which is what they are.

I don’t know where the word “coati” comes from but it ought to be from 2 words that mean “big” and “nuisance,” which is what they are.

These coatis come in droves at the slightest hint of food, of scraps, or even a crumb. Nona, Papa, and I had to eat our sandwiches in the shelter of a little park food shop.  We had to find a space to sit on the floor with all the other humans trying to get away from the coatis and the monkeys too.  This is the kind of thing that Nona and Papa think is fun.  Maybe, if they were as little as I am, they would realize its just fearful.

Speaking of size.  Even the little things here are scary.  You know those “little” insects that you call “ants.”  Take a look.

Even the ants are big here at Iguazu Falls, and they have big pinchers to bite you!

Even the ants are big here at Iguazu Falls, and they have big pinchers to bite you!

This ant could take my head off with those pinchers, and I’m made of solid plastic.  Even Nona and Papa had to take care not to step where these ants gathered.  Some people get bitten, and they say that those ant bites really hurt.

.Nona kept telling me not to dwell on the negative. “Solbit, look on the bright side, take time to see the beautiful things too,” she advised me. She did have a point.  I have to admit that, if you can get past the wetness and the loudness of falls, they have an expansive beauty.  Also, some of the little things are harmless and pleasant to watch.

OK, Nona's right, some things at Iguazu Falls are both pretty and safe, like this butterfly on her camera.

OK, Nona’s right, some things at Iguazu Falls are both pretty and safe, like this butterfly on her camera.

Still, getting back to the pueblo (the town) and, as they say, “to civilization,” made me feel so much better.

I couldn’t wait to get through those doors and out of nature, the Great Outdoors. Give me some inside space.  Ah, the Great Indoors calmed me, and, even though I'm an iguanodon, I felt at home again.  Whew!

I couldn’t wait to get through those doors and out of nature, the Great Outdoors. Give me some inside space.  Ah, the Great Indoors calmed me, and, even though I’m an iguanodon, I felt at home again.  Whew!

That probably sounds strange coming from a Jurassic like me, but I guess I’m becoming more and more like you humans.  After all, I hang out with humans so much that they’ve become what’s normal to me.  Normal is good, right?  Bye!  I’m your friend.

Love,

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Solbit

August 2016

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  • You may be asking yourself, “Who is Solbit?” Solbit is a fictional character, but she is a real plastic dinosaur, sent to us unsolicited in a package we ordered from Photojojo. So, she’s a plastic jurassic. Solbit is short for the four names given her by our grandchildren: Sparkle, Orangie, Lulu, Breakit. We tend to use her given names for when she’s been naughty. Thank you for visiting Tales of a Plastic Jurassic. Solbit likes company and hopes you’ll come back.
  • You can learn more about Solbit at her About page and in the earlier posts, “Solbit: How I Got My Name” and “Solbit: How I Got to Travel.”