Solbit has problems with Ollantaytambo

Dear Nicalai,

Ollantaytambo.  You just try to say that with the proper Spanish pronunciation, and you’ll understand my problem.  I just can’t say it right.  I think I’m supposed to say something like “Oh-Yawn-Tay-Tom-Bo,” but, whenever I say it, the local people just stare at me and not because I’m a plastic jurassic.  I know that stare. It says, “What did you just say?”

If you think the line of people going up is on an escalator, you would be wrong, like I was. Nope, they're climbing stairs, a lot of them.

If you think the line of people going up is on an escalator, you would be wrong, like I was. Nope, they’re climbing stairs, a lot of them.

Even though I can’t tell you how to say “Ollantaytambo,” I can tell you that it is an ancient town — a ruins —  in the Sacred Vally of Peru, and you really want to go see it sometime — even though you have to climb a lot of old stone stairs to see it.

Imagine that you have no bulldozer, no motorized cranes, no jack-hammers, just hand tools. Now imagine using your hands and those hand tools to make this place out of rock!

Imagine that you have no bulldozer, no motorized cranes, no jack-hammers, just hand tools. Now imagine using your hands and those hand tools to make this place out of rock!

Ollantaytambo is the place where the Incas resisted the Spanish conquistadors and won, at least for a little while.  That was a long time ago, even way before Papa was born and he’s really old. Eventually, the Spanish conquered them. Of course, eventually, somebody made the Spanish leave. Seems like they had one war after another. Papa is always telling me that, whatever the problem or whatever the question, war is not the answer, because it just causes a lot of suffering.

I know that war isn't good for anybody, but something else is good for everybody: water! We need to protect water.

I know that war isn’t good for anybody, but something else is good for everybody: water! We need to protect water.

I noticed that here in Ollantaytambo, and also at Machu Picchu, the Incas had systems for running water all through their towns. How smart!

Look up there on the mountain above the town. Do you see those buildings? That's where the Inca stored food supplies.

Look up there on the mountain above the town. Do you see those buildings? That’s where the Inca stored food supplies.

The Inca grew a lot of food on the terraces and then kept their extra supply of food in storage buildings, called granaries. They seemed to think of everything … except the coming of the Spanish who wanted the Inca’s gold — all of it. I wonder why didn’t they just buy it instead of stealing it from the Inca?

I have to go to bed now because we’re getting up really early tomorrow.  Poor Nona. She won’t be able to read in bed all morning, but that’s one of the prices of travel.  Bye!

I’m your friend.

Love,

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Solbit

July 2016

*New reader? Get oriented below.

  • You may be asking yourself, “Who is Solbit?” Solbit is a fictional character, but she is a real plastic dinosaur, sent to us unsolicited in a package we ordered from Photojojo. So, she’s a plastic jurassic. Solbit is short for the four names given her by our grandchildren: Sparkle, Orangie, Lulu, Breakit. We tend to use her given names for when she’s been naughty. Thank you for visiting Tales of a Plastic Jurassic. Solbit likes company and hopes you’ll come back.
  • You can learn more about Solbit at her About page and in the earlier posts, “Solbit: How I Got My Name” and “Solbit: How I Got to Travel.”

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