Solbit feels a calm settling in

Dear Nicalai,

You know how Nona likes to wake up at 6:30 or 7:00 AM, sit up in bed, pull out her iPad, open her New York Times Replica Edition app, and read the newspaper until mid-morning right there in bed? Then maybe she’ll eat a little something around 11. Well that’s not happening here in Manu. We have to get up really early, usually by 5:00 AM or before!

At 5:50 AM, we’ve already gotten dressed, had breakfast, piled into our river canoe, and started our river trip to another interesting place in Manu.

At 5:50 AM, we’ve already gotten dressed, had breakfast, piled into our river canoe, and started our river trip to another interesting place in Manu.

Poor Nona! She not only has to get up and get out of bed early but she also has to have her breakfast well before 6:00 AM, most days. Also, no electricity and no internet. So she can’t have a fresh NYT daily.  She reads old, back issues, but not in the morning. She has to wait until we get back from our morning excursions.

On the Madre de Dios River (that means “mother of god river,” I think), it strikes me: how nice to name a river for the mother of god. She deserves a lot of credit, right?

On the Madre de Dios River (that means “mother of god river,” I think), it strikes me: how nice to name a river for the mother of god. She deserves a lot of credit, right?

We sit in our comfortable car seats that have been installed in our big river canoe, and, the calm of the river settles over me. I can tell that Susie, Tom, Nona and Papa feel the calming effect too.  In fact, one of them is so “calm” that I hear snoring sounds.

Our canoe went through a little rough water, and that was a sign that we had gone from the Madre de Dios River to the Manu River. Another way to tell the difference is that the Manu River looks much more brown, that is, muddy.

Our canoe went through a little rough water, and that was a sign that we had gone from the Madre de Dios River to the Manu River.  Another way to tell the different rivers is that the Manu River looks much more brown, that is, muddy.

Speaking of mud. If you have rubber boots, you want to wear them on these river trips, because getting on and off the river canoe can be a wet and muddy exercise. Of course, I don’t need rubber boots, because Nona always carries me in her purse pocket.

Dorothy, our travel companion from Germany, brought her rubber boots and they served her well.  I even think the boots look fashionable. Don’t you?

Dorothy, our travel companion from Germany, brought her rubber boots and they served her well.  I even think the boots look fashionable. Don’t you?

Well, you are probably so bored by my story of being calm on these rivers that by now you’re snoring too.  Still, if you ever need to calm yourself, you might consider an early morning — I mean very early — canoe trip on a wide river somewhere.  Sometimes calm can be a good thing.  I bet it might even be healthy.  Bye for now.

I’m your friend.

Love,

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Solbit

July 2016

*New reader? Get oriented below.

  • You may be asking yourself, “Who is Solbit?” Solbit is a fictional character, but she is a real plastic dinosaur, sent to us unsolicited in a package we ordered from Photojojo. So, she’s a plastic jurassic. Solbit is short for the four names given her by our grandchildren: Sparkle, Orangie, Lulu, Breakit. We tend to use her given names for when she’s been naughty. Thank you for visiting Tales of a Plastic Jurassic. Solbit likes company and hopes you’ll come back.
  • You can learn more about Solbit at her About page and in the earlier posts, “Solbit: How I Got My Name” and “Solbit: How I Got to Travel.”

One thought on “Solbit feels a calm settling in

  1. […] Guess what? That little wiggly thing was alive, and it wasn’t Papa’s skin that was wiggling either. No, we found out that, because this thing was coming out of Papa’s ankle now, that meant that some weeks ago an insect, called a “bot fly,”  had bitten Papa and laid eggs inside Papa’s skin.  That would have happened a few weeks ago when we were in the jungle of the Amazon Basin area of Peru, a region called Manu.  Remember, I wrote you before about that trip? […]

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