Solbit Finds Herself in a Scary Place

Dear Nicalai,

Being a Jurassic in a Human world can be confusing sometimes.  For example, you love the Sharks.  I know, because you tell me that you go to watch them play ice hockey all the time.  They must not be the same sharks that we saw here in Galapagos in the ocean, though.  Being a Jurassic in Galapagos can be scary sometimes.  Our guides said these sharks have big mouths, sharp teeth, and strong jaws. Scary creatures. I only want to see them at a distance.

When is a Shark not a shark? Answer: When it’s on ice and not in the water!

When is a Shark not a shark? Answer: When it’s on ice and not in the water!

I think your Sharks have ice skates, hockey sticks, and pucks.  Right?  Same name; different animals. I think my sharks look very graceful in the water.  Maybe your Sharks are graceful on the ice?

We didn’t just see animals and plants in Galapagos, we also saw interesting landscapes.

These cliffs are red because of the iron in the rocks. Sort of like rusted rocks, I guess. Look at the angle though! I thought these rocks might slide down on top of us at any moment.

These cliffs are red because of the iron in the rocks. Sort of like rusted rocks, I guess. Look at the angle! I thought these rocks might slide down on top of us at any moment.

Last time I wrote, I mentioned the different types of Boobies.  Nona told me — she’s always so informative — that two of them, the Blue-footed Booby and the Nazca Booby, nest in these red cliffs. I’d be afraid to have a home on the side of these cliffs — too scary, but, then, I can’t fly like Boobies.

Papa tried to make a joke — Papa’s not very funny and not nearly as informative as Nona — about the iron in the rocks.  He said, “With all the iron on Rabida Island, I guess the animals don’t have a problem with ‘iron-deficiency anemia.’  No need for Geritol here!”  Nobody laughed or even chuckled. Nona said that the joke “fell flat.”  I was embarrassed for Papa.  People just looked at him with blank stares.  Nona tried to make him feel better by telling him that no one else was old enough to have any idea what Geritol was. I don’t think she helped.  He really is old, you know.

On another island, we went on a hike, and, just as I was getting comfortable and feeling at home on the island, we had a scare.  This bird with a sharp beak made it clear that we were getting too close to its territory.  We were not welcome.

Not one word, just body language told us, “Go away or else!”

Not one word, just body language told us, “Go away or else!”

I wanted to go away right away! But not Nona.  She had to stay to take pictures of this short-eared owl. By the way, it doesn’t really have ears like you have, just tufts of feathers that make you think “ears.” But, like other owls it has really, really good hearing. It finds its prey (it’s food) by sound in the dark. Imagine that!  Nona and Papa have to turn on the lights to find food in the kitchen.

Another scary thing here is that lot of things seem to die — well, actually, get killed — and rot away on these islands in Galapagos.  We kept seeing the remains of dead animals.

I saw the skeleton of a small sea lion on Rabida Island, and, also, on another island, I saw skeletons of iguanas and, sometimes, iguana skeletons that were still covered by all dried up and brittle iguana skin!

I saw the skeleton of a small sea lion on Rabida Island, and, also, on another island, I saw skeletons of iguanas and, sometimes, iguana skeletons that were still covered by all dried up and brittle iguana skin!

Our guides said that — and this grossed me out, so you may want to skip over it — the hawks use their strong toes to strangle iguanas until they are dead, and then the hawks eat the soft parts of the iguana — the eyes and the tongues — and they leave the rest for the crabs, ants, and anybody else who is hungry for rotting reptile flesh. Yikes! Get me off this island and back in the boat!  Bye.

I’m your friend.

Love,

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Solbit

April 2016

*New reader? Get oriented below.

  • You may be asking yourself, “Who is Solbit?” Solbit is a fictional character, but she is a real plastic dinosaur, sent to us unsolicited in a package we ordered from Photojojo. So, she’s a plastic jurassic. Solbit is short for the four names given her by our grandchildren: Sparkle, Orangie, Lulu, Breakit. We tend to use her given names for when she’s been naughty. Thank you for visiting Tales of a Plastic Jurassic. Solbit likes company and hopes you’ll come back.
  • You can learn more about Solbit at her About page and in the earlier posts, “Solbit: How I Got My Name” and “Solbit: How I Got to Travel.”

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