Solbit, Observes Growing Up Gull in Astoria

Dear Nicalai,

Girl, am I ever glad that Nona and Papa brought me to Astoria, Oregon.  What a cool town!  First, it has water and boats.

Nona said that Astoria offers views that are great for photos. I agree.

Nona said that Astoria offers views that are great for photos. I agree.

When we walked down there along the docks, we saw a bunch of big, sleeping, seals lazing on big wood planks.  Have you noticed how much seals and sea lions like to sleep? Sorta wonder if maybe Papa has some seal DNA in him. Know what I mean?

At least, I’m pretty sure they were seals … or were they sea lions?  Nona says there’s a difference.  I’m gonna go with seals in this letter.

Then, we walked up the hill and around town.  We came to the site of a historic place, a fort.  Built in 1811, a sign said that fur traders (what’s a fur trader?) and adventurers gathered at this place, Fort Astor.

Papa exploring the site of Fort Astor or was it Fort George?

Papa exploring the site of Fort Astor or was it Fort George? He’s taking a photo of a painting on the wall.

Later it was called Fort Astoria and, another time, Fort George.  What should I call this place?  In this letter, I’m going with Fort Astoria.

Oh, you probably don’t want to know this, but, about that “fur trader” thing, I asked Papa.  He said people used to catch and kill furry animals, take their skin off with sharp knives, “cure” the skins, and then sell those skins, called furs, to other people who took the furs and made them into hats and clothing.  Yuck!  And Nona says she even remembers seeing ladies in church with fox heads and fur on their shoulders! Double yuck!

Looking at a site of an old Fort may be fun for old you-know-whats, but I got bored. So, Papa said, “Solbit, let’s go to the beach and look at birds.”

The momma gull is the gray and white one, and the juvenile gull is the black one.

The momma gull is the gray and white one, and the juvenile gull is the black one.

We saw a mother gull and her child, a juvenile gull.  They provided some drama.  What fun! See, the juvenile gull wanted the momma to feed it.  The momma gull kept saying, “No.”  That would be in some kind of gull language, of course. I don’t speak any gull languages, but I could tell what she meant just by her “body language.”

Eventually, the juvenile gull got really, really insistent that momma had to give it some food.  That’s when momma gull put her foot down, so to speak. She turned her back on him or her, whichever.

Papa said, “I think momma gull is trying to make the juvenile gull become independent,” and I said, “Yes, and the young gull sure doesn’t like that.”

Papa said, “I think momma gull is trying to make the juvenile gull become independent,” and I said, “Yes, and the young gull sure doesn’t like that.”

When momma gull turned her back on her child gull or whatever you call a juvenile gull — the child gull started whining, really screeching at her.  I think maybe that’s what a lot of children do when they don’t get their way.  Though I’m sure that when he was a child, Papa was an exception to that generalization.  I wonder if Nona would agree with me?

Well that’s my news from Astoria for now.  Stay tuned! Bye.

I’m your friend.

Love,

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Solbit

September 2015

*New reader? Get oriented below.

  • You may be asking yourself, “Who is Solbit?” Solbit is a fictional character, but she is a real plastic dinosaur, sent to us unsolicited in a package we ordered from Photojojo. So, she’s a plastic jurassic. Solbit is short for the four names given her by our grandchildren: Sparkle, Orangie, Lulu, Breakit. We tend to use her given names for when she’s been naughty. Thank you for visiting Tales of a Plastic Jurassic. Solbit likes company and hopes you’ll come back.
  • You can learn more about Solbit at her About page and in the earlier posts, “Solbit: How I Got My Name” and “Solbit: How I Got to Travel.”

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