Solibit declares “It’s all about style and opinion”

Dear Nicalai,

When it comes to style, most people dismiss the opinions of a plastic jurassic like me.  Well, often they don’t even bother to dismiss me, they just presume A., that I don’t have a style, and B., that I don’t have opinions.  Now, that’s just wrong.  Take this nigella flower for example.

You’re thinking blue colored flower, right? I’m thinking something else.

You’re thinking blue-colored flower, right? I’m thinking something else.

Of course, it is a blue-colored cornflower, but that’s just so blah.  Take a good look at it again and then also look at me up at the top of this blog.  See?  It’s a shade of blue.  That kind of blue is called “azure.”  It’s like the sky on a clear day, AND azure complements which color?  Orange!  That’s me! Don’t believe me, well, just look it up on wikipedia.  Here’s the link:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Azure_(color) So, azure and I go together like a horse and carriage. Also, this tiny cornflower is little, and little is just my size.

Now take this tree blossom as another example that tells something about my style.  It’s a perfectly good blossom on a lovely tree, but, look, it’s just not my style.

Even though it’s little, like me, it’s color just doesn’t do anything for me.

Even though it’s little, like me, it’s color just doesn’t do anything for me.

It’s washed out pink color and fragile appearance just doesn’t complement my orange coloring nor my strong constitution … and strong opinions.

Now I can go in an entirely other direction with my style.  I can find something little and something of another color and be very happy with it.  Here’s my last example. Green moss.

Don’t you love the way this moss and it’s rich green color envelop the rock without smothering it?

Don’t you love the way this moss and it’s rich green color envelop the rock without smothering it?

Don’t you think that this moss enhances the appeal of the rocks?  To me, this moss was so inviting that I said to Nona, “Please, lay me down on that moss so I can smell it and take a nap on it.” Let me tell you, girl, that was a lovely part of my afternoon. Pure, natural luxury. So, now you know.  I have opinions, and I’ve got style. Bye!

I’m your friend.

Love,

Solbit

June 2015

*New reader? Get oriented below.

  • You may be asking yourself, “Who is Solbit?” Solbit is a fictional character, but she is a real plastic dinosaur, sent to us unsolicited in a package we ordered from Photojojo. So, she’s a plastic jurassic. Solbit is short for the four names given her by our grandchildren: Sparkle, Orangie, Lulu, Breakit. We tend to use her given names for when she’s been naughty. Thank you for visiting Tales of a Plastic Jurassic. Solbit likes company and hopes you’ll come back.
  • You can learn more about Solbit at her About page and in the earlier posts, “Solbit: How I Got My Name” and “Solbit: How I Got to Travel.”

Solbit discovers her fortune

Dear Nicalai,

Hey, do you know what a fortune cookie is?  Well, I didn’t.  Nona and Papa took me to a Chinese restaurant here in Bend, Oregon.  At the end of our meal, our waitress gave each of us a little wax paper package. “What’s that?” I asked, and Nona said, “Solbit, it’s a fortune cookie.”

Like I knew what a fortune cookie was. “What’s a fortune cookie?” I replied.  Papa jumped in, “Open it, Solbit, and find out.”  Very funny.  “Papa, you know very well that my little plastic arms can’t open that package.  Will you open it for me, please?”  He did.

Inside, we found a crunchy sort of pocket cookie, and, when Papa broke it open for me, I found a little slip of paper inside with writing on it.  This is what it said.

“A four-wheeled adventure will bring you happiness,” the fortune cookie told me.

“How did they know? How could they possibly have known that we’re on a road trip in a car?  How could they know that our trip is making us happy?” I asked in amazement.

Papa and Nona just giggled, then Nona paid the bill, and we left.  I still don’t know how the cook or the baker in that kitchen could know that our road trip brings us happiness.  What’s happiness?

Here’s happiness.  One afternoon, Papa and I sat down on a bench in Shelvin Park by Tumalo Creek.  We enjoyed the shade of the tall pines and the gurgling sounds of the creek.

Papa and I like to sit and be quiet in places like this.

Papa and I like to sit and be quiet in places like this.

Papa fell asleep, but I didn’t.  If you sit quietly and watch, you can see all kinds of birds, mammals, little bugs, and even a slithering snake.  If fish were swimming in the creek, I didn’t see them, but that doesn’t mean they weren’t there.

I just love days like this, when we walk in the woods, sit by streams, and, as Nona says, “walking is good for what ails you.” I have no idea what she means. Do you?

I get this view a lot when I'm in Nona's pocket on hikes.

I get this view a lot when I’m in Nona’s pocket on hikes.

Every walk we take, I learn something new and see something new.  For example, did you know that pine trees, at least some, have blossoms?  I didn’t, not until we took our hike in Shelvin Park.

My first pine blossom sighting and it's a pretty one.

Look at this pine blossom. Isn’t it pretty?

Well, I still don’t really know the answer to my question “What’s a fortune cookie?” but that fortune cookie I got at the Chinese restaurant sure knows something about me:  four-wheeled adventure with Nona and Papa has led me to happiness.  Think about it, I could have been left lying around in the Photojojo shop or Nona and Papa could have dropped me in their waste bin.  Instead, I’ve gotten to travel with them to strange places, make new friends, and learn things.  How lucky am I?

I’m your friend.

Love,

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Solbit

May 2015

*New reader? Get oriented below.

  • You may be asking yourself, “Who is Solbit?” Solbit is a fictional character, but she is a real plastic dinosaur, sent to us unsolicited in a package we ordered from Photojojo. So, she’s a plastic jurassic. Solbit is short for the four names given her by our grandchildren: Sparkle, Orangie, Lulu, Breakit. We tend to use her given names for when she’s been naughty. Thank you for visiting Tales of a Plastic Jurassic. Solbit likes company and hopes you’ll come back.
  • You can learn more about Solbit at her About page and in the earlier posts, “Solbit: How I Got My Name” and “Solbit: How I Got to Travel.”

Solbit sees cool places for a house …

Dear Nicalai,

After traveling around the world and up and down the west coast of the U.S., I’ve begun to think about different houses and places I might like, if I ever settle down.  We’ve only been in Oregon a few days now, but already I can see myself living here.  Papa says that’s because it’s part of a region of the country that is sometimes called “Ecotopia,” but I just think its because it is beautiful here.

DSC00659

I love the view from this house we visited on a lava butte.  I could live here.

Did you know that a volcano made that lava butte? Unbelievably hot liquid rock came out of the ground and then cooled into solid rock.  I asked the park ranger, “Ms. Ranger, now that the molten rock has cooled, could we rent this place and move in please?”  She told me, “Sorry, Sweet Pea, but no one gets to live on top of the lava butte these days. It’s a public park.”  I almost missed what she said, because I was looking around for someone named “Sweet Pea,” but then I realized she meant me.

After we moved on, I asked Papa, “Why did she call me Sweet Pea?  Do I look like a pea?”  Papa said, “No, Solbit, you look sweet,” and he explained that “Sweet Pea” is “a term of endearment.”  A what?  He said she used it because she liked me! I get that a lot, you know.

Well, since I can’t live up high on that lava butte. Maybe I’ll go the other way. I could be happy with the flat view from this place.

Lower Klamath NWR and Tule Lake NWR

Papa said he grew up in a farm house that, like this one, was surrounded by flat fields, but his place didn’t have the distant view.

As soon as he said that, alarm bells went off in my little head.  I hear that farm work is hard and takes a lot of time. Maybe I wouldn’t want to be a farmer, but I’d like living here, if I didn’t have to be a farmer.

Finally, when we got here to Bend OR, I found my ideal. A little stone cottage by the Deschutes River. From this little cottage, I could look out the window and see all kinds of birds and river otters and sometimes a jumping fish!

DSC00807

The sign here said “mechanical house,” so we’d have to remove the pumps and machines before moving in.  I think the location would be worth the effort, don’t you?

Oregon sure is my kind of place. All the countries and states we’ve visited have been great, but something about Oregon especially appeals to me.  I asked Nona and Papa if we could settle down here. Papa said, “No way, Sweet Pea, we still have a lot of traveling to do.”  I think he used that term of endearment like the park ranger did because he likes me, even if he doesn’t like my idea of getting a house here.

Who knows maybe I’ll want to live in the next place we visit. Yeah, like a place up near Machu Picchu in the Andes Mountains.  So I’m not complaining.

I’m your friend.

Love,

Solbit

May 2015

*New reader? Get oriented below.

  • You may be asking yourself, “Who is Solbit?” Solbit is a fictional character, but she is a real plastic dinosaur, sent to us unsolicited in a package we ordered from Photojojo. So, she’s a plastic jurassic. Solbit is short for the four names given her by our grandchildren: Sparkle, Orangie, Lulu, Breakit. We tend to use her given names for when she’s been naughty. Thank you for visiting Tales of a Plastic Jurassic. Solbit likes company and hopes you’ll come back.
  • You can learn more about Solbit at her About page and in the earlier posts, “Solbit: How I Got My Name” and “Solbit: How I Got to Travel.”

Solbit exclaims, “It’s almost a family reunion!”

Dear Nicalai,

This letter may sound depressing, but, if you read all of it, it has a good ending.  I promise.

Maybe Papa or Nona have told you that I’ve been down in the dumps lately.  Don’t misunderstand, please.  I love them and you, but I kinda wish I had another family.  Oh, I want to be in your family.  What I mean is, I’d also like to have a family that, well, that looks more like me.  Sadly, as Papa explained, dinosaurs have gone extinct.  So, that’s not going to happen.

When he said that, I just crumbled. Not really crumbled, of course.  I’m a plastic jurassic, and plastic doesn’t crumble. No, I mean, emotionally, I crumbled.  Nona said, “Solbit, you look like you need a good walk.  Let’s go to Tule Lake!”  I replied that I’d rather just stay home and mope, thank you.

Of course, when Nona decides that you’re going to do something, you’re going to do something.  Off the three of us went to the lake.  I put on a good pout to show her that I was not pleased.

Almost as soon as we started walking at Tule Lake — that’s near Klamath Falls, CA where we’re staying, now — we started seeing different birds.

Lower Klamath NWR and Tule Lake NWR

First, we saw the long-billed dowitchers, pictured here. They are common at Tule Lake, but they were new birds for Nona and Papa. Me, too.

Lower Klamath NWR and Tule Lake NWR

Then we saw the American coot and the white pelican.

“Solbit, did you know that scientists think that these birds are modern day dinosaurs?” Papa asked me.  I glumly grumbled, “No way, Papa.  You’re making that up.”  Nona jumped in to back up Papa,  “Yes, Solbit, the scientists now think that today’s birds have a common ancestor in the dinosaurs.”

Then I understood what Papa said. It’s called an “Ah, ha!” moment.  I literally said, “Ah, ha! Does that mean that I could be related to these birds?”  Papa told me, “Yes, Solbit, you could say that, and guess what.  Some scientists now think that maybe some dinosaurs even had feathers.”

Well, my spirits soared. By the time we saw this American avocet, I blurted out, “Wow, coming to Tule Lake is sort of like a family reunion for me!  Isn’t it?”

Could the American avocet be a distant relative of mine?

Could the American avocet be a distant relative of mine?

“You could say that, I guess,” Papa answered. So, the next thing you know, I’m talking to Nona and Papa about planning another family reunion here for me, real soon. “Can we please come out here to the lake for another walk?” I asked.

Lower Klamath NWR and Tule Lake NWR

This bird is called a kildeer, but I’m sure it doesn’t hunt deer.  It’s too small and delicate. Wonder how it got its name?

The sun was setting on the lake, and we had to leave, but we could see more and more of my distant relatives flying into the lake to spend the night.  To see them flying in from different directions to spend the night here gave me a good, warm feeling, and I realized then that Nona was right — as she often is — what I needed was just a good walk to lift my spirits.  I’m glad I went on the walk with them today.  Bye.

I’m your friend.

Love,

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Solbit

May 2015

*New reader? Get oriented below.

  • You may be asking yourself, “Who is Solbit?” Solbit is a fictional character, but she is a real plastic dinosaur, sent to us unsolicited in a package we ordered from Photojojo. So, she’s a plastic jurassic. Solbit is short for the four names given her by our grandchildren: Sparkle, Orangie, Lulu, Breakit. We tend to use her given names for when she’s been naughty. Thank you for visiting Tales of a Plastic Jurassic. Solbit likes company and hopes you’ll come back.
  • You can learn more about Solbit at her About page and in the earlier posts, “Solbit: How I Got My Name” and “Solbit: How I Got to Travel.”