Solbit Observes Animal Behavior

Dear Nicalai,

“Hey, Dino Girl, you lookin’ at me?” The squirrel caught me by surprise.  I didn’t think he would notice little me, but I guess squirrels have good eyesight. I’m no scientist, so you better check that “fact,” the one about squirrels’ eyesight.

Bushy the Squirrel and I just met at  Huntington Gardens. We made eye contact, and I thought maybe we had a connection, but he went right back to work.

Bushy the Squirrel and I just met at  Huntington Gardens. We made eye contact, and I thought maybe we had a connection, but he went right back to work.

He said collecting nuts was his job, and he never has enough time to get it done. “Where does the day go?” he asked, as if I knew. “Typical animal behavior,” Papa said, when I expressed disappointment that Bushy had gone.  “Gathering food is more important than spending time chatting with a Plastic Jurassic. Hey, let’s go get a snack,” he suggested.

When we got to the cafe area, all the shaded tables were taken, except one.  Nona said, “There’s a table. Let’s grab that before someone else gets it!”

Proud Peacock stood his ground (or his glass table top, in this case) when we tried to take this cafe spot.

Proud Peacock stood his ground (or his glass table top, in this case) when we tried to take this cafe spot.

“Yuck! Who wants to eat from a table somebody has walked all over?” I protested. “What’s wrong with that bird? Doesn’t he know anything about table manners?”

Papa calmly replied, “Solbit, that’s just typical animal behavior. The bird doesn’t know about table manners. It just knows that the table is a good place to look for food. Food is more important to it than manners.”  He just got a wet napkin, shooed the peacock away, and wiped the table clean.

After a snack at the cafe table, we met a very different animal. It kept doing push ups on the side of a rock. Don’t you think that’s odd? So I asked, “Excuse me, Ms, my name is Solbit, and I wonder why are you doing push ups all the time?”

Liz, a friendly local lizard, was happy to take time to talk with me, “Not many visitors ask me anything,” she said.

Liz, a friendly local lizard, was happy to take time to talk with me, “Not many visitors ask me anything,” she said.

“Hi, I’m Liz. Mucho gusto. I’m not really doing push ups.  That would be human behavior, and I’m not human; I’m a reptile.”  “Oh, I said, maybe were related, because I’m a dinosaur!” “Probably, somewhere back in the past, we might have a common ancestor, but, to answer your question, look at me; I’m short, so I keep pushing up to get better views. I have to be on the look out for all kinds of animals that want to eat me.”

I wanted to reassure her right away, “You can be sure that we don’t want to eat you.  You are safe with us!  Nice chatting. Goodbye!” I said to Papa, “I’ll bet that’s typical animal behavior too, huh, looking out for something or someone who might try to eat you.”

As we walked further down the path, I exclaimed, “Hey, that’s not typical animal behavior!”

Bruiser was wearing black, leather shoes!

Bruiser was wearing black, leather shoes!

As we approached Bruiser, I said, “Hello, I’m Solbit, and I like your shoes.” He was surprised to hear my little voice, and it took him a moment to find me looking down at him from the zipper pocket of Nona’s purse.

“Thanks. I’m Bruiser, and this pavement gets awfully hot, so the lady I live with got me these shoes to protect my paws.  What a relief it is! Now I can enjoy walking these Gardens and staying on the path like the humans insist we do.”

“Papa,” I said, “You don’t often see a dog wearing shoes, so that’s not typical animal behavior, is it?”  Papa, trying to educate me, replied, “Solbit, you are correct.  That would be called “atypical” animal behavior. That means not typical.”

Solbit engages in “atypical” dinosaur behavior, just for fun.

Solbit engages in “atypical” dinosaur behavior, just for fun.

“So, Papa, why use a word like “atypical” that no one understands when you could just say “not typical” and everyone would understand that,” I asked.  Papa smiled and replied, “Solbit, you’re learning to ask good questions, and that’s a good one.  What do you think the answer is?”

“Maybe the person saying “atypical” animal behavior wants to show off his knowledge,” I guessed. Papa walked away muttering, “From the mouth of a Plastic Jurassic.”  Do you think he took my answer the wrong way? I mean I was just guessing.  Now, I think that maybe I should have said, “So that the person can teach someone else another word to put into her vocabulary.”  Hey, I learned two words or phrases today, typical and atypical animal behavior. Cool, huh!

I’m your friend.

Love,

signature

Solbit

March 2015

*New reader? Get oriented below.

  • You may be asking yourself, “Who is Solbit?” Solbit is a fictional character, but she is a real plastic dinosaur, sent to us unsolicited in a package we ordered from Photojojo. So, she’s a plastic jurassic. Solbit is short for the four names given her by our grandchildren: Sparkle, Orangie, Lulu, Breakit. We tend to use her given names for when she’s been naughty. Thank you for visiting Tales of a Plastic Jurassic. Solbit likes company and hopes you’ll come back.
  • You can learn more about Solbit at her About page and in the earlier posts, “Solbit: How I Got My Name” and “Solbit: How I Got to Travel.”

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s